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20130423
20130423
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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
to contrast that with a well known famous saying among lawyers that hard cases make bad law. in a case like this, with such extraordinary circumstances, around such an aberrant event, the best opportunities to pass meaningful legislation are not in the wake of these sort of crazy one off extraordinary events. what do you make of that? >> well, it is a real conundrum. on the one hand, holmes was right. you don't want extraordinary circumstances to create general law for average circumstances. but in another sense, this was not extraordinary. in fact, we've been living in something of a bubble. the fbi has done actually a fairly amazing job over the last decade of stopping many terrorist acts like when they occurred in other countries and europe and the middle east. and this was one that got through. but there are ways in which you could actually change laws to further enable the fbi. going back to michael isikoff's report. what if members of this mosque in boston had contacted law enforcement authorities under a new program and warned them that this fellow tsarnaev was looking a little errat
to be watching these guys. maybe we need to change the laws so we can watch them. on the other side lawmakers say this is a free country. you can't just watch somebody because they are strong believers. how deep is the divide? >> we are going to see weeks and months of debate about this. same kind of othing we saw after the failed underwear bombing plot and the times square bombing plot, questions about holding the suspects as enemy combattants. if there is any evidence that the fbi or intelligence services made a mistake expect republicans to seize on that and use it as an opportunity to accuse the president of being too politicly correct in challenging what they think is a war against radical islam. >> i want to bring in a republican from pennsylvania and a member of the homeland security committee. good morning. >> nice to be with you. >> as you go into the briefing what are your concerns and questions in. >> we want to try to know what happened as every other american does with a little more detail. i think you identified the questions that are out there. from the front end, what is it that i
god, and our responding brothers of law enforcement were able to help us keep him in this area. >> by the time he jumps out of the car, he is about 300 yards from your officers. >> right. >> who now have to make the decision about chasing him or taking care of the officer down. and what do your officers do? >> the transit officer, it was a two man cruiser, we are giving aid, trying to get an ambulance to get him to the hospital which we know he needs desperately. they focus on that and other responding officers tried to pursue the second brother. >> i think people have been wondering how did this guy escape into the darkness. so what we know is he was about 300 yards away from the officers at the time he jumps out of the car. >> right. >> then is off into the darkness. >> exactly. >> and the people who are responding are not watertown police officers, the extra troops who were coming in are not from watertown, do not know the streets, and for them, there's a struggle about exactly how to coordinate the spot where he got out of the car and started running. >> right. you can imag
? >> represented watertown before the redistricting. i will tell you i was home like everyone else. the law enforcement officials ask everyone to stay indoors. i did because i wanted our law enforcement officials to have the ability to focus their full attention on finding and capturing the people that did this. that is obviously what happened. i hadn't heard a single complaint from anybody in boston about what happened. we were asked to cooperate and we did. we are hearing personal stories from people who were injured or from family and relatives and friends. we have learned a little more about some of the victims who lost their life, how close we all are. it is a closely knit city and it should come as no surprise how many people had some relationship to somebody who got hurt or in some cases killed. >> you directly because you know some of the victims' families. krystle campbell who is one of the victims who died went to high school with your kids she was laid to rest yesterday. you know the family of 8-year-old martin richard. have you been able to get in contact with them? have you bee
questions put to you by law enforcement agents or by the assistant u.s. attorney, mr. weinreb. the judge then says i want to make it clear you not prohibited from making statements, but if you do, they can be used against you. you are not required to make a statement at this initial appearance, and any statement you do make may be used against you. finally, if i ask you any questions here in this hearing or at any future hearing which you think might incriminate you you have the right not to answer. do you understand everything i have said about the right to remain silent? the defendant nods affirmatively. the judge says you have the right to have this court assign counsel if you cannot afford counsel or if you cannot obtain counsel. can you obtain a lawyer? the defendant says no. and this is the first time we know that he can speak, because he does speak. he says just that one word. and apparently he says it with difficulty, because the judge responds by saying, let the record reflect that i believe the defendant has said no. i have provisionally appointed the federal defender to repres
as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist under u.s. law. united states citizens cannot be tried in military commissions. this is absolutely the right way to go and the appropriate way to go. and when it comes to united states citizens, it is against the law to try them in military commissions. >> and it matters that the white house is treating the idea of holding an american citizen outside of the american legal system as what it is, which is crazy and unacceptable. and it matters that appears to be where americans stand on the issue too. when asked just last week in the midst of the aftermath of the boston bombing, with the images and videos of the horror there, the top of everyone's mind, which worries you more, the government will not go far enough to investigate terrorism because of concerns about constitutional rights, or that it will go too far in compromising constitutional rights in order to investigate terrorism. more people answered they are more worried about the government going too far. today is the first day of a big, important test for us as a country. a test of w
on boston bombing coming up this hour. when we return we're going to get into the law of this case. dzhokhar tsarnaev was formally charged today. he'll be prosecuted through the criminal justice system despite republicans who say he should be treated as an enemy combatant. >>> later, the russian connection. we have new details about the older brother, tamerlan, and his six-month trip overseas to russia, that area, as he became increasingly more devout in his religion and radicalism. >>> here in washington, the marathon bombings have already started to change the debate on things like -- you knew this was coming -- immigration. >>> finally, life started to return to normal this weekend in boston. i was up there as the slow healing begins. this is "hardball." as we say up there, "hardball." the place for politics. >>> he will not be treated as an enemy combatant. we will prosecute this terrorist through our civilian system of justice. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was of course, white house spokesman jay carney short by before 1:00 p.m. today making clear the boston suspect will not be t
penalty, is that what you're saying? >> reporter: sure. because then he's got cooperating with law enforcement, but he's also lost his leverage by saying this. it is in his interest to be able to tell them something. >> you think a lawyer, michael, would have told him to hold out until he got a deal? >> reporter: absolutely. absolutely. the one thing a lawyer is going to try to do at this point is to save his life. the one way to do that is show cooperation by pointing the finger at somebody else or helping them find somebody else. look, i don't take these statements at face value, just, you know, just to be clear. you know, he could well be protecting somebody. clearly there were others who they were talking to. it's hard to imagine the two of them just simply became radicalized by themselves without any encouragement from anybody else. >> that surprises me, too. >> reporter: seems there was an accomplice in the plot. and also, we have the statements from the uncle who says there was somebody who radicalized the older brother. >> so let me thank you very much. >> reporter: that's
of the law enforcement should be combhited to their efforts. >> court documents contain new details about thursday night's carjacking. the fbi show tamerlan and dzhokhar tsarnaev in cambridge at a gas station where they drove with the owner of the suv they carjacked. one began the carjacking by pointing a gun at the driver and saying, "did you hear about the boston explosion? i did get" the carjacker showed the driver he had bullets in his gun according to fbi and said, "i'm serious." at the shooting in watertown where tamerlan was killed, other explosives were found. a boston police commissioner says that's one reason he thinks the brothers planned other attacks. >> we got to step over some unexploded devices that they threw at the officers and i can only understand from that that they had other targets. they were going other places. >> that's nbc news' pete williams reporting. >>> well, today members of the house will get a top secret briefing on the boston bombings. meanwhile, the head of the senate intelligence committee is demanding the fbi explain why more wasn't done to investigate
was shocked by her husband and brother-in-law's actions. >>> in dagestan, the boys' mother, still in denial. >> i am mother. i have -- you know, i know my kids. i know my kids. i really my kids would never get involved into anything like that. >> in the boston area, local police are now taking a closer look into a possible link between older brother, tamerlan tsarnaev, and a 2011 unsolved triple homicide. >>> and local police are also taking a look at what links there may have been. in canada, two men charged with plotting to blow up a passenger train between toronto and new york make their first appearances in court while on capitol hill senator charles grassley keeps raising the boston plot as he opposes the timetable for immigration reform. >> the tragic events that occurred in boston and the potential terrorist attacks of the u.s. canadian railroad are reminders that our immigration system is directly related to our sovereignty and national security matters. >>> and guess who is coming to dinner? the president hosts the women of the senate, senator kirsten gillenbrand is here to preview
significantly more complex. american law enforcement officials currently track terror networks by tapping into chatter, monitoring videos and reports of field agents, but even if the fbi is tipped off to potential american terrorists, there's are limits to what can be done. "the new york times" reports that after the tib questioned tamerlan tsarnaev in 2011, officials had quote no authority to watch him because they found no terrorism activity at the time. this scenario that an american could and would do this while flying under the radar raises serious questions regarding national security. the "washington post" writes the boston attacks might serve as a new model for terrorism in the 21st century. seeing how two kids with backpack bombs seem to have succeeded in putting a major u.s. city on lockdown, it may now dawn on al qaeda leaders that a series of small-scale attacks like this conversation the same impact as one spectacular mass casualty attack. through a combination of skill and luck, we've done well at preventing the next 9/11. preventing the next boston massacre might not be as
. >> if people are coming from countries where, perhaps, they grew up under sharia law, i think we can make a safe assumption they have been radicalized. >> lindsey graham was on some show this week saying this shows how we need better tracking. i'm thinking this shows how we need better immigrants. >> how do we give asylum to people from islamic countries, or islamic territories? i would submit people shouldn't be coming here as tourists from check kn chechnya after 9/11. dagestan, chechnya, kyrgyzstan, uh-huh. as george bush would say, none of them stands. >> let me get this right, krystal. asylum is not based on those that may be in desire of leaving countries that we think their policies are no good. asylum is based on who you are. have you ever heard anything more biased and -- and in many ways profiling people just based on their nationality? i mean, it's the exact anti-thesis to what asylum is. >> it's the exact antithesis of everything this country stands for. judging people. not allowing them into this country because of their religion is unbelievable. i would love to know how many
suspect is read his rights and lawmakers raise new questions about what law enforcement knew about him and his brother prior to last week's deadly attack. >>> food for thought. president obama's slaft dinner dates continues tonight. this time it is with the women of the senate. how much could these meals be the ticket to some deals? no evidence yet. >>> a bonanza of second chance surprises. mark sanford blazing a trail, trying to make old faces new again. but can any of these folks actually get elected again? >>> good morning from washington. i'm chuck todd. this is your tuesday edition of "the daily rundown." it is april 23rd. right to my first reads of the morning. >>> 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev who was shot in the head, neck, leg and hands according to newly released documents, has been officially charged with using a weapon of mass destruction that resulted in three deaths and more than 170 injuries. he's also been charged with malicious destruction of property by means of an explosive device resulting in death. both charges carry the death penalty as a maximum sentence. tsarnae
involvement. >> the reports of involvement by her husband and brother-in-law came as an absolute shock to them all. >> and in dagestan, the suspect's mother is adamant that her sons are innocent. >> what happened is a terrible thing, but i know that my kids have nothing to do with this. i know it. i am mother. >> joining us now from boston is nbc news national investigative correspondent michael isikoff. and frank silufo, director of the homeland security policy institute at george washington university. good afternoon, to both of you. mike, as the investigations continue both here and oversea, we understand that investigators are confident these brothers acted alone. even as their family members express utter bafflement. what are we learning about the larger case against these suspects? >> reporter: well first of all, this is looking, martin, more and more like a case of self-radicalization. now, nothing is conclusive and, you know, we're far from the end of this investigation right now. >> of course. of course. >> reporter: but the preliminary indicators, first, you have tsarnaev saying the
delayed so passengers, advocates and law enforcement experts can weigh in. the tsa plan to allow knives with small blades on planes starting this thursday. it would have been the first time they would have been back on passenger planes since september 11th, 2001. >>> new york city at it again. it may become the biggest city in america to raise the legal age for buying cigarettes to 21. the city already opposes the highest cigarette taxes in the country. it also bans smoking in bars, parks and beaches while launching graphic advertising campaigns about the hazards of smoking. smokers of retailers say those restrictions are nannyish and bad for business. it aims at stopping young people from developing a habit that is the leading causes of death. they say the measure would drive younger smokers to neighboring communities t. hearing on the proposal set for may 2nd. i have a funny feeling joe and mika will have more to say about that story. the folk singer guitars who opened the woodstock festival in 1969 died on monday. ♪ sometimes i feel like i'm in time. >> rich chi haven's family said
tobacco from 18 to 21. the new law would not prohibit people under 21 from possessing or smoking cigarettes. if passed, the measure would be the strictest limit on tobacco of any u.s. city. awesome. >> you kind of wonder when the mayor is going to pass a law that is going to require each new yorker to read at least 30 minutes of poetry. >> no. this is good. >> that one i would not expect to happen. >> this is what we need. we actually don't even need anybody buying or smoking cigarettes and getting sick from it and getting other people sick too. >> mika, can i point something out? >> sure. >> the matrix awards yesterday. women in communications. mike barnicle's wife introduced by mika brzezinski. >> oh, look at her. mika did a great job. and you know, ann did pretty damn well herself. >> ann was amazing. there's martha stewart. there were impressive women there. but i had the great honor of -- this is funny. i had the great honor of introducing ann. and they asked at one point for last year's matrix winners to stand up and barnicle stood up. >> i was wondering when mike barnicle
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)